Should I be concerned

  sattman 19:51 10 Mar 2004
Locked

Many times, advice on here and advice I learn from computor help desks advise users to "simply reformat" and it sounds so easy to do !!!

I am sure that this advice is always given with a aim to help.

If we accept that the computor skills of users being given this advice will include a range of expertise, many will have little knowledge.

Even hardended users have found a simple reformat and reinstall can turn into a very demanding process

Does anyone share my view that forum contributors should maybe consider the pitfalls and risks when given advice.

Many allready do give this warning.

Maybe I am just over concerned.

  VoG II 19:53 10 Mar 2004

Last resort as far as I'm concerned. I only ever advise this when the situation is clearly irrecoverable.

Good point.

  leo49 20:26 10 Mar 2004

Of course it's the last resort except with basketcases but I can understand why telephone support staff instruct folk to do it particularly inexperienced users, as novices don't have the experience to recognise what information concerning their problem is important.Consequently,rather than grope around trying to drag out of the punter what has happened,what is happening on the screen,what actions they performed prior to the fault,etc,it's easier and faster to tell them to slip in the restore disc.

It's hard to believe how ignorant some folk are.Last night I spent 40 minutes on the phone trying to talk a friend through installing 98se and Office2000 on a blank machine.First the bootable CD wouldn't boot.No problem,I'd given him a bootdisc just in case so in that went.Dos command after dos command was refused and I began to doubt my sanity.Then the penny dropped I asked him to run a DIR on the CD and he began to read off folder after folder of Office2000 contents.When asked he said that as all 3 discs had to be loaded he didn't see that it made any difference in what order they were installed.My mistake obviously was to assume he knew the difference between an OS and a program.Equally obviously,he didn't.

  spanneress 20:35 10 Mar 2004

I am fairly new (at posting anyway) in the forum, but I rarely advise anyone to format unless it is absolutely necessary.

I am not sure whether it is the forum contributors or the forum readers who should be wary of giving / accepting advise. There must be a clause about accepting sole responsibility somewhere....

  GANDALF <|:-)> 00:31 11 Mar 2004

I usually advise a reformat on computers over 3 years old that have had a lot of programmes put on and taken off and have slowed down with error messages appearing. No matter how much one trawls the registry and cleans the HD, a reformat gets the computer back to day one.

Reformat/restore saves a lot of fiddling and contrary to popular belief/folklore, is one of the easiest things to do. If people have the time or inclination to fiddle about with a computer for a few hours OK but why make an easy job so difficult. Type a few simple commands, put in a boot disk or even easier, whack in a restore disk, sit back and knock back a couple of stiff whiskeys or tea, for the methodist inclined, slap on an episode of Shameless and 35 ish mins. later, you have a new computer for very little operator input. Don't see any problem.

'I am not sure whether it is the forum contributors or the forum readers who should be wary of giving / accepting advise. There must be a clause about accepting sole responsibility somewhere'...*ahem*, all advice is given freely and it is only advice not a cure. People have no need to accept any advice nor are they forced to accept advice. they use the advice at their own risk but if they have done a decent backup there is little that can go wrong. We need to get real here and realise that we are dealing merely with computers and it is not like anyone is freely giving prostate advice/ drugs.

Of course anyone is also free to phone any £1 minute helpline. ;-)))


G

  woodchip 00:36 11 Mar 2004

You will find most times that the one who posted the thread gets so fed up trying to correct the problem post's to say " I formated the drive and reloaded windows and it's now OK" so what about that one

  frazky 02:42 11 Mar 2004

..easier to have an image of the unsullied os just after you installed it with all the hardware drivers email and other personal settings.

(it *is* a bind - usually a whole weekend day to reinstall all hardware and utils and settings from scratch)- i've mentioned migration utilities before .. *maybe someone can comment* if these can help in the final stages of recreating your environment ,after the crude reformat... they can maybe create a databasee for your settings.

[but i can see this may cause probs with the bloated XP.. prob need a 2nd HDD , rather than CDR.]

1st rule :'backup'..2nd rule: 'backup'.. 3rd rule 'backup'

  spanneress 08:52 11 Mar 2004

"
Should I be concerned
[1]
sattman Wed, 10.03.04 | 19:51
Many times, advice on here and advice I learn from computor help desks advise users to "simply reformat" and it sounds so easy to do !!!
I am sure that this advice is always given with a aim to help.

If we accept that the computor skills of users being given this advice will include a range of expertise, many will have little knowledge.

Even hardended users have found a simple reformat and reinstall can turn into a very demanding process

Does anyone share my view that forum contributors should maybe consider the pitfalls and risks when given advice.

Many allready do give this warning.

Maybe I am just over concerned.



VoG Wed, 10.03.04 | 19:53
Last resort as far as I'm concerned. I only ever advise this when the situation is clearly irrecoverable.
Good point.



leo49 Wed, 10.03.04 | 20:26
Of course it's the last resort except with basketcases but I can understand why telephone support staff instruct folk to do it particularly inexperienced users, as novices don't have the experience to recognise what information concerning their problem is important.Consequently,rather than grope around trying to drag out of the punter what has happened,what is happening on the screen,what actions they performed prior to the fault,etc,it's easier and faster to tell them to slip in the restore disc.
It's hard to believe how ignorant some folk are.Last night I spent 40 minutes on the phone trying to talk a friend through installing 98se and Office2000 on a blank machine.First the bootable CD wouldn't boot.No problem,I'd given him a bootdisc just in case so in that went.Dos command after dos command was refused and I began to doubt my sanity.Then the penny dropped I asked him to run a DIR on the CD and he began to read off folder after folder of Office2000 contents.When asked he said that as all 3 discs had to be loaded he didn't see that it made any difference in what order they were installed.My mistake obviously was to assume he knew the difference between an OS and a program.Equally obviously,he didn't.



spanneress Wed, 10.03.04 | 20:35
I am fairly new (at posting anyway) in the forum, but I rarely advise anyone to format unless it is absolutely necessary.
I am not sure whether it is the forum contributors or the forum readers who should be wary of giving / accepting advise. There must be a clause about accepting sole responsibility somewhere....



GANDALF <|:-)> Thu, 11.03.04 | 00:31
I usually advise a reformat on computers over 3 years old that have had a lot of programmes put on and taken off and have slowed down with error messages appearing. No matter how much one trawls the registry and cleans the HD, a reformat gets the computer back to day one.
Reformat/restore saves a lot of fiddling and contrary to popular belief/folklore, is one of the easiest things to do. If people have the time or inclination to fiddle about with a computer for a few hours OK but why make an easy job so difficult. Type a few simple commands, put in a boot disk or even easier, whack in a restore disk, sit back and knock back a couple of stiff whiskeys or tea, for the methodist inclined, slap on an episode of Shameless and 35 ish mins. later, you have a new computer for very little operator input. Don't see any problem.

'I am not sure whether it is the forum contributors or the forum readers who should be wary of giving / accepting advise. There must be a clause about accepting sole responsibility somewhere'...*ahem*, all advice is given freely and it is only advice not a cure. People have no need to accept any advice nor are they forced to accept advice. they use the advice at their own risk but if they have done a decent backup there is little that can go wrong. We need to get real here and realise that we are dealing merely with computers and it is not like anyone is freely giving prostate advice/ drugs"

While I agree with your sentiments sir it is a sad but true fact that we are becoming a more americanised nation whereby one refuses to accept responsibility for ones own actions and looks for someone else to either blame or sue.

If a reader terminally damages their PC while undertaking some action as advised on here...it is a bone of contention on their part is it not as to where the blame lies?

Just a thought.

*klick klack* (knitting needles back out)

  spanneress 08:54 11 Mar 2004

Please excuse all that blurb above..not quite sure what happened there unless it was my knitting needle hitting the copy paste buttons!

  leo49 09:00 11 Mar 2004

"I am fairly new (at posting anyway) in the forum"

Why on earth would we think that ? :o)

  spanneress 09:05 11 Mar 2004

LOL....I may be new on here me'laddy but I may also be long in the tooth and even longer in the wincyette nighty department.

Besides, in the the time it has you to read and reply, I have knocked up a rather charming bri-nylon royal blue child's jumper with attractive boat motif....

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