Router talking to PCs but PCs can't access 'net

  Snill 10:29 07 Dec 2005
Locked

I have Blueyonder broadband through a cable modem. Wanting to set up 2 Windows XP pc's on a wireless network,I have acquired a Newlink 802.11g router and two USB 2.0 adapters (the same make). I have run an ethernet cable from the modem to the router and plugged in the two adapters and installed the drivers. The little monitor icons on the pcs are green and both showing "excellent" signal but neither pc is able to connect to the internet. I have got the feeling I have been stupid and omitted a vital link in the chain (maybe I need to configure IE on each pc??) can any kind soul point me in the right direction. Thanks

  PaulB2005 12:58 07 Dec 2005

The software on each of the "Wireless" PC will need to be told which network to connect to. Double click on the little icons that show "Excellent" and you should see a list of available networks. One will be yours. Then follow the instructions to get the PC to connect to that network.

  Snill 13:27 07 Dec 2005

Thanks. Is that where it asks me for a SSID? Am I right in presuming that I will have to use the same SSID as the router?

  mgmcc 20:29 07 Dec 2005

The SSID is the wireless network's name. After you have entered an SSID in the router's wireless settings (and you should replace the default name with one of your own) this is the name of the "Available Network" that your Wireless Adapter should find so that you can "connect" to it.

The Wireless Adapter should be set to work with "Infrastructure" networks (or they may be called "Access Point" networks), so that it finds the network's SSID rather than having it entered manually.

  Snill 23:52 07 Dec 2005

Thanks for that. I have now configured the router and usb adaptors with the default settings (no security encryption). They are all quoting the same SSID and are set to "infrastructure". All the lights are green yet still no internet connection. Is there anything else I can try please?

  Snill 00:32 08 Dec 2005

As a desperate measure I ran the Blueyonder diagnostic tool on one of my PCs and got the following information. I'm hoping someone will notice some glaring error or other!

TCP/IP STACK: TICKED
DHCP: TICKED
IP ADDRESS: 192.168.1.102
SUBNET MASK: 255.255.255.0
STATIC DNS SERVER: (BLANK)
DHCP ASSIGNED DNS SERVER: 192.168.1.1
STATIC DEFAULT GATEWAY: (BLANK)
DHCP ASSIGNED GATEWAY: 192.168.1.1

Thanks again.

  PaulB2005 07:23 08 Dec 2005

On the laptop. OPen IE, Tools, Internet OPtions, Connections, Goto LAN Settings and UNTICK all he boxes. Close IE and reopen.

Also set it to Never Dial A Connection.

Did you have the Internet on the laptops before?

Try resetting the LSP Stack - click here Download, run and hit Fix. Then reboot.

  Snill 09:02 08 Dec 2005

Thanks Paul I'll try that later. Both PCs have been on the same Blueyonder connection before, yes.

  mgmcc 09:32 08 Dec 2005

<<< I ran the Blueyonder diagnostic tool on one of my PCs and got the following information. I'm hoping someone will notice some glaring error or other! >>>

Those settings are fine for the computer concerned. Perhaps what would be more significant is whether the router itself has obtained its addresses from Blueyonder.

When changing the connections from "PC to Cable Modem" to "Router to Cable modem", you must power off the modem for a couple of minutes. Then power on the modem, wait for the four green lights, then boot the Router and wait until it is fully operational and finally boot the PC.

By accessing the router's setup pages in a web browser, you should be able to see if it has obtained its IP etc addresses from Telewest.

  Snill 09:45 08 Dec 2005

Thanks mgmcc. So , dumbing it down slightly, should I just start again from scratch and connect things in the order you suggest? In the past I have just moved the cables round with everything booted up so I can see how that might have caused a problem. Also I'm not sure how I can tell where the router has obtained its IP etc addresses from.
Thanks again.

  mgmcc 13:55 08 Dec 2005

<<< should I just start again from scratch and connect things in the order you suggest? >>>

It is important when changing the connection to the Cable Modem that it is powered off. This is so that it reboots, detects that a different "adapter" is connected to it and allocates a new IP address. Previously it has married up the MAC address of the network adapter that you have connected with to the IP address it allocates. Change the network adapter and that relationship is lost and you can't get online.

<<< I'm not sure how I can tell where the router has obtained its IP etc addresses from. >>>

When you go online with a PC, you get the addresses by DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) from the ISP. These include the IP, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway and DNS Server addresses. If you replace the PC's connection to the modem with a router, it is the router that connects directly with the ISP and it gets these addresses. The router then allocates LAN (Local Area Network) addresses to the computers connected to it and the IP addresses are usually in the 192.168.x.x range. The router then, as its name suggests, "routes" the internet traffic to the appropriate computer(s) in the network.

When you access the router's Setup pages in a web browser, you can usually view the IP and other addresses that have been allocated by the ISP. My router has an address from Blueyonder in the 82.41.94.x range, Subnet Mask 255.255.248.0, Default gateway 82.41.88.1 and DNS addresses 62.31.64.39 & 62.31.112.39

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