Power supply concerns over potential GPU installat

  fsdfsd 16:18 08 Apr 2017
Locked

I asked elsewhere ( click here ) but thought it wouldn't hurt to get a few seconds opinions. Details can be found in the link (I don't want to wrestle with the character limit here).

The main question is this: I want to install either an Nvidia GTS 250 or a Radeon HD 4850. 300 W ATX Power Supply. As detailed in the post I could buy 450W PSU off of junk mail for for about $10 but my budget is really really tight and adding in that extra $10 would have me gritting my teeth. My computer's specs (insofar as I could ascertain them) are detailed in the link given above.

  rdave13 16:49 08 Apr 2017

Minimum system requirement for the 250 is 450 W

click here buy a cheap PSU either. Think carefully before upgrading the GPU if it's worth it for what you want to do.

Don't

  rdave13 16:50 08 Apr 2017

I'm sure you can make sense of the post �/p>

  fsdfsd 11:09 09 Apr 2017

"Think carefully before upgrading the GPU if it's worth it for what you want to do."

I want to play games and I have no dedicated graphics card, just integrated graphics (Intel G45/43 Express Chipset). My objective is to get a machine capable of running indie games on the lowest settings with a smooth frame rate. I guess it would be nice if I could play Fallout 4 (absolute lowest settings of course. Throw in some performance mods too) but it's not important.

"Minimum system requirement for the 250 is 450 W"

That seems to be based on guesses about the standard system using a GTS 250. According to Power Supply Calculator click here, my system load with the GTS 250 (2 GB version for worst case scenario. I don't know which version the seller is actually selling) is only 198 W (recommended power supply 256 W)

I'm still probably going to buy a new PSU anyway, unless I find it utterly impossible to scrounge up the cash, because:

1: My PSU is a generic. It would be nice to greatly lower the risk of dying in a fire set by my PSU. 2: I would prefer the HD Radeon 4850 , with which my systems consumption ranges from 212 W (recommended power supply 272) W to 342 W (recommended power supply 432 W) depending on the HD Radeon 4850 version. I'm definitely not going to risk running the 2 GB version with my measly 300 W generic PSU. 3: The newly purchased PSU might come with any connectors I need.

I'll just copy and paste one of my replies in Tom's Hardware here:


I would have replied around 7 hours ago were it not for my internet outage. My apologies for not responding earlier.

"What´s your budget and what do you wanna do with it?"

My budget is R500. That's $36.28. I would be gritting my teeth but I guess I could stretch it to R650 ($47.24). I just want to get a cheap GPU for my desktop which currently does not have one. I couldn't care less about fancy graphics. I'll gladly play on minimum settings. I just want to be able to play most games with a smooth frame rate. I guess you could approximate it by saying that I want to be able to play indie games and games up to say, 2014, with a smooth frame rate on the minimum settings.

I'm looking at this "GT 250" (probably actually a "GTS 250" since their is no "GT 250" in Wikipedia's list of Nvidia cards)": R350 ($25.44)

click here also looking at this Ati HD 4850: R500 ($36.34)

click here has two plus points over the first card:

1: I can be more sure of what it is since it is a Wikipedia listed graphics card. 2: It seems to be a bit better, judging from the benchmarks.

The question is, are these cards compatible with my power supply?

First, their is the question of connectors. Presumably these connectors can be cheaply purchased and in any case the person I'm purchasing them from will probably hand them over with the card. What I'm concerned about is not getting the connectors but whether or not they will even be able to connect to my PSU. As I'm sure you have surmised, I know almost nothing about PSUs or connectors.

Second, their is the question of power supply. I don't care if my PSU dies from being run at above 80% output as long as it doesn't take anything with it and it lasts for a short while; I'm sure I'll be able to afford a proper PSU in a few weeks.

I found this offer for a PSU: 450W R150 ($10.9)

click here I mention I'm tight on cash and know almost nothing about PSUs ? :D . I'd rather not have to buy and install this but if I have to I will.


I'm not really worried about installing the PSU anymore. It looks pretty simple.

Anyway, you have my gratitude for the help so far.

My gratitude for any further help from anyone in advance.

I'm It Did

  fsdfsd 11:39 09 Apr 2017

gdf

  fsdfsd 11:41 09 Apr 2017

Whoops. Is there any way to delete or edit posts?

" Don't...

I'm sure you can make sense of the post �/p> "

Sounds pretty ominous. I'm guessing it means: "Don't try that GPU with your PSU as you will surely perish horrifically in searing flames"

  wee eddie 13:01 09 Apr 2017

The first thing that occurs to me is that the case is described as being a "Micro Tower"

Will your chosen card fit into that?

  fsdfsd 16:47 09 Apr 2017

sd

  fsdfsd 16:53 09 Apr 2017

Damn it, I made another accidental nonsense post.

Anyway...

"The first thing that occurs to me is that the case is described as being a "Micro Tower"

Will your chosen card fit into that?"

From the link in my OP:

Desktop Dimension

Height 14.76 in 37.5 cm Width 6.98 in 17.73 cm Depth 16.88 in 42.87

I checked out the dimensions of one of the cards and recall thinking that it should fit easily. The only problem would be if the desktop designers were utterly retarded and designed it so that the GPU has to be put in along the width. I don't think that's the case because the product description overview seems to refer to variants with GPUs installed. If the GPU is supposed to be installed width wise I'm not sure any GPU could fit.

Still, I took a few pictures of the inside of my case. I'll probably take a look just in case.

  rdave13 00:22 10 Apr 2017

Whoops. Is there any way to delete or edit posts? " Don't... I'm sure you can make sense of the post �/p> " Sounds pretty ominous. I'm guessing it means: "Don't try that GPU with your PSU as you will surely perish horrifically in searing flames"

Hell... no. Cheap PSU could mean dead mobo and GPU,drive, ram... Searing flames is a last possibility. Ask Samsung.

  Menzie 00:45 10 Apr 2017

I have been fortunate when I was on a budget and bought cheap power supplies but I'll second the don't cheap out on the power supply bit.

Going with something like a Cooler Master, EVGA or Corsair will provide good stable clean power and minimise the chances of your components getting fried.

You don't have to go with a top of the line 1200W but a good 450W supply should be on your list.

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