Partitioning: 2 Hard Drives

  Legoracer 12:11 25 Jul 2007
Locked

Can anyone offer me any advice on the optimal partitioning of the 2*250GB HDs in my set up.

I will be starting from scratch with Vista Ultimate as my primary OS and will probably

install Linux to play with at some point.

The main use of my PC is a general Family PC, including Internet, Email, intermediate level

video,photo and mp3 editing/storage and also to stream content to my XBox 360 (but I'm also

planning to use it as a HTPC in the near future and stream directly to my AV system.

In my current XP set up, when I stream to the XBox, the PC has to encode video on-the-fly and

as a result it's virtually unusable for anything else at the same time. I only have 1 250GB

HD until I add the other tomorrow and I suspect that this heavy read/write is the bottleneck.

Hopefully adding a 2nd HD will help.

My initial thoughts on the partitioning is:

Drive 1
50GB C:\Vista OS & All Programmes
20GB Unpartitioned for Other OS/s at a later date
30GB E:\Temporary location to write on-the-fly video encoding (Original resides on 2nd HD)
50GB Acronis Recovery Zone (For backups of C:\)
Remainder unpartioned for future use

Drive 2
8GB P:\ Pagefile
230GB D:\ User documents, photos, music, videos etc


Any thoughts on this would be much appreciated.
Perhaps a Raid0 configuration would be worthwile but I thought having seperate drives for reading and writing videos would be more beneficial for OTF encoding.

I will also have an external HD to back up the lot.

My rig:
MoBo: GigaByte GA-965P-DS3
CPU: Intel E6600
RAM: 3GB DDR2-667 (3*1GB)
HD: 2*250GB WD

Thanks in advance for any assistance,
Stuart.

  johndrew 14:03 25 Jul 2007

I think you are making life hard for yourself by making so many partitions. Perhaps you should consider the advice given by PCA in various articles and keep your OS on a partition by itself, your programs and other items on another.

I would also suggest you keep your backups on a separate drive to that which you normally use. If the first drive were to fail you would lose your OS and everything on it including your backups.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 15:16 25 Jul 2007

There is absolutely no need to partition and it would be a futile exercise. I would put both operating systems on the same drive as a dual boot. I would not use the internal disks for backup but I would buy an external 80Gb as a backup disk. The second internal disk could be used for programmes that you rarely use or you could run them from the external disk as you will not notice any difference. If you do not want to buy an external disk use the main internal as the carrier for both OS and the second disk as a backup for the OS and documents.

G

  Quiller. 15:20 25 Jul 2007

" There is absolutely no need to partition and it would be a futile exercise. I would put both operating systems on the same drive as a dual boot. "

To do that, dual boot, you would have to partition the drive.

  Batch 16:22 25 Jul 2007

Personally, I think it best to keep OS & Programs (Program Files) together (on a partition) as they are tightly bound via registry and restoring one without the other is a receipe for problems (if not disaster).

And there is an advantage in keeping just the OS & Programs in a discrete partition. It can be backed up and restored independently of everything else VERY quickly and easily. Similarly other data (on other partion(s) )can be backed up as required. My "system" partition takes just 3 - 4 minutes to restore (with Acronis True Image), so at any hint of problems I can restore qand be away again in next to no time. Contrast that with having to restore 100 or 200 GB!

  GANDALF <|:-)> 17:19 25 Jul 2007

click here You do not need to with Vista as Linux will install on unpartitioned space using the Shrink tool ;-))
You can also have XP and linux on the same partition;-)) click here

Patitioning is so twentieth century.

G

  GANDALF <|:-)> 17:23 25 Jul 2007

..continuing..you can keep photos and music on the external drive or the second HD so if you need to restore the image you would only need to restore from the main drive (4-6Gb tops). There will be no problems putting programmes on the external or second drive. I put nearly all my programmes on an external and I cannot see any difference from having them on the main. I am not into gaming but having those progs on a slav drive 'might' cause a speed problem.
If you are having to fire up Acronis and restore a lot then you have other problems that you need to address.

G

  Quiller. 19:51 25 Jul 2007

" You do not need to with Vista as Linux will install on unpartitioned space using the Shrink tool ;-)) "

When Vista shrinks the drive and creates unallocated space. click here That IS creating a partition.

The disk is split into 11.71 GB and 8.29 Gb. So the 20Gb hard disk has been split in to two seperate disks.

ie
partitioned

  GANDALF <|:-)> 19:54 25 Jul 2007

Hate to get into semantics but the space is not separate from the rest of the drive. Partitioning is totally unecessary in 2007.

G

  Quiller. 19:59 25 Jul 2007

Your second click here refers to red hat and states

" This article assumes that you can wipe your machine clean and start fresh. If you can't, and you already have Windows loaded, you will need to purchase a program such as Partition Magic to free up enough space on the hard drive to install Linux."

In other words you need partitioning software to create the partition.

" Loosely, the order of things will be as follows:

Install Windows XP Professional and give it 2.0 GB of space out of the 4 GB available.
Install Red Hat Linux 7.3 into the other 2 GB. "

So the test 4Gb hard drive is to b e partitioned into 2 X 2Gb drives. eg partitioned.

" Installing Windows XP Professional
To dual boot, you can install Windows XP exactly as you normally would, while making sure to leave room for the Linux partition. For more information on installing Windows XP, check out Brien Posey's articles "

In other words don't destroy the 2nd partition for the redhat installation.

" Installing Red Hat Linux 7.3
Once Windows XP is installed, you can install Red Hat Linux 7.3 by inserting CD One of three and letting it boot. Then, just follow the instructions on the screen. When it's time to partition the disk, I chose the default option to Remove All Linux Partitions On This System since I had no Linux partitions "

In other words install redhat on the 2nd partition.

  Quiller. 20:03 25 Jul 2007

" Hate to get into semantics but the space is not separate from the rest of the drive. Partitioning is totally unecessary in 2007. "

The hard drive is partitioned. It may not be a windows partition but it has split the disk.

Show me a single partioned disk that holds both vista and linux.

PS

The reason you shrink or expand the drives in Vista is create unallocated space. You either use that space or you leave it dormant. Either way you have partitioned the disk. you have split it up.

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