Opinions re colour management

  hatrickj 13:23 25 Sep 2004
Locked

My Serif photoplus s/ware has options for using colour management for monitor and printer. I wonder if anyone has views about usage of the facility for amateur photography. I want, of course, to get good images on to paper but is it of much benefit to other than the professional or amateur aspiring to that standard? I am using a LG1710B monitor and HP Deskjet 5150 printer.

  Diodorus Siculus 13:31 25 Sep 2004

It is pretty good actually as what you see on screen is not always what you see in print. The software should get you closer.

  jack 14:18 25 Sep 2004

Diodorus Siculus is right it is not bad, but monitor to paper colour matching is a huge topic
In industry a massive investment in kit.
For the rest of us its, test strips of prints like old darkroom days and lots o' tweaking - but paper, room lighting, even the clothes you wear when making comparison are critical -
If it looks close and pleases, waste no mre ink ,paper, and bloodpressure.

  Cook2 15:52 25 Sep 2004

click here
Open up the image, right click and save. Paste into your graphics programme and print.

Adjust your screen to match the printout. Any future acceptable pictures should print OK.

This is the easiest and simplest way I've found of doing it.

  Cook2 15:52 25 Sep 2004

click here
Open up the image, right click and save. Paste into your graphics programme and print.

Adjust your screen to match the printout. Any future acceptable pictures should print OK.

This is the easiest and simplest way I've found of doing it.

  Valvegrid 18:31 25 Sep 2004

You'll find it very difficult to match a monitor to a print, in fact its nearly impossible. This is because of the two different mediums, the monitor is transmission and the print is reflection, therefore the colour temperature is different between them, also the eye gets very confused trying to get a correct white balance on a monitor, you'll end up chasing your tail around and around.

The best way to balance is to get the colour correct on the print, then adjust the monitor to suit, don't spend too much time on it! The art is just glancing at the monitor, you'll soon get used to the correct settings.

I hope this helps, its based on 13 years in the photographic trade working on photographic machines trying to balance monitors to prints.

Good luck, you'll enjoy yourself.

  Wak 19:44 25 Sep 2004

You may find these two sites of interest when adjusting the monitor.
click here
click here

For what it's worth, I started by adjusting the brightness and contrast of the monitor using the above sites and then took a digital photograph of a colourful indoor scene. I then adjusted the monitor to suit that scene ( Red, Green, Blue) as the screen colours can be continuously compared to the original.
I then adjusted the printer output to suit the monitor using a favourite graphic program. The paper used for printing must also remain the same type as different papers produce different results.
It can take a lot of time and effort but I reckon that my prints are now a fairly accurate representation of the original scene and also of what is on the screen.
However, if you are already happy with your printer output then leave things the way they are and concentrate on other more important things in life.

  hatrickj 20:30 25 Sep 2004

Thanks for advice so far: it gives a lot to think about. Cook2, I tried your prog and most tones were very close except the sweater that had slightly tended to orange and most of the options in Pplus made scant difference. Wok, you mention the type of paper. Is it an guarantee that paper made for the printer manufacturer will give best results and will age be a factor? It can be tempting to buy larger packsbut is it lways worthwhile? I realise as well that inks can be a problem so am assuming to chose the proper ones at the best price rather than gnenerics.

  Cook2 21:02 25 Sep 2004

hatrickj. The paper settings are important, I just did two on plain paper. I set one as Plain Paper and the second as Photo Quality Inkjet Paper. The first came out near perfect but the second was very 'washed out'.


Both my prints came out with the sweater as pink. Your orange tinge? Have you double checked your print head alignment and done a head clean recently?


As another experiemnt, go into the colour management of your monitor, printer and scanner, make a note of the profiles then delete them. Try without the profiles to see the results. You can always Add them again afterwards, one at a time if necessary.


Once you have your screen set, just use your graphics programme to give your future pictures an acceptable picture on screen and you'll be suprised at the printed results.


I've always found Ilford paper best and usually wait for PC World to do buy one get one free or buy two get one free. Unfortunately I've heard that Ilford have gone bust.

  Cook2 21:02 25 Sep 2004

hatrickj. The paper settings are important, I just did two on plain paper. I set one as Plain Paper and the second as Photo Quality Inkjet Paper. The first came out near perfect but the second was very 'washed out'.


Both my prints came out with the sweater as pink. Your orange tinge? Have you double checked your print head alignment and done a head clean recently?


As another experiemnt, go into the colour management of your monitor, printer and scanner, make a note of the profiles then delete them. Try without the profiles to see the results. You can always Add them again afterwards, one at a time if necessary.


Once you have your screen set, just use your graphics programme to give your future pictures an acceptable picture on screen and you'll be suprised at the printed results.


I've always found Ilford paper best and usually wait for PC World to do buy one get one free or buy two get one free. Unfortunately I've heard that Ilford have gone bust.

  Wak 22:22 25 Sep 2004

I don't think it matters which make of paper you use as long as you stick to it as you will be setting your printer to produce an accurate rendition of the image on that particular paper.
I also have the printer set to PLAIN paper and leave it at that even when I use Glossy Photo paper.
When changing the setting from Plain to Glossy, some printers alter the amount or mixture of ink in an effort to compensate for the absorption rate (or otherwise) of the Glossy paper and thus change the colour composition of the final print.
So if you adjust the printer so that it prints a good image on Plain paper and then reset it to glossy paper and print on glossy paper you will most probably get a slightly different printer output.
My own printer (Lexmark) prints as I want it to when set for Plain paper (even when using Glossy paper) but prints slightly bluer when set for Glossy paper.
This is a trial and error thing which you must test for yourself but it pays to be aware of the difference some of the settings can make.

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