North & south bridge

  dan12 19:29 03 Jan 2006
Locked

Hi
can anyone tell me what the functions are of the north and south bridge are? I believe the north bridge is the closer to the cpu.I know they have something to do with data transfer. i could go and search the net but you guys put it so much better which is really helpfull for us begginers.
Thanks for your time and advise

  dan12 19:38 03 Jan 2006

hope am posting to the correct forum only been on for few days finding my way about.
am sure you guy will tell me if wrong.
thanks

  stalion 19:38 03 Jan 2006

does this help click here

  dan12 20:28 03 Jan 2006

Thanks stalion,

Found your link to be informative. so if the North bridge deals with the fast traffic between cpu and the ram (memory)
which governs the speed the memory or the cpu?
hope thats not too confusing.And if you are using the ddr memory does that make the traffic flow twice as fast ie in stead of an A road you have a dual carriageway.
Its just my way of thinking you can only go as fast as the slowest component

  DieSse 00:17 04 Jan 2006

*which governs the speed the memory or the cpu?*

Neither exactly governs it - to a great extent they are independant of each other. Hence you could have a fast CPU with slower RAM and a slwoer CPU with faster RAM. Which would give a faster system? - it depends on what the system is doing.

*does that make the traffic flow twice as fast ie in stead of an A road you have a dual carriageway.*

Yes it makes the traffic flow twice as fast - but by increasing the speed of the traffic, not by widening the road - so the analogy is a poor one. Widening the road, is to some extent what is done in 64 bit systems compared with 32 bit systems

  Skills 00:29 04 Jan 2006

Neither the speed of the memory and cpu will be dependant on those components what actually comes into play is the bus between the components and the speed that is operating at. The speed that those buses are running at donotes the speed that the devices attached to are running at click here

Different CPU's run at different bus speeds and the same with memory,a faster bus speed will mean a faster component.

DDR doesnt run twice as fast what it does is allows data to be accessed in memory twice each clock cycle, so although its bus speed isnt any faster the way it operates allows it to act like it does at 2x the speed click here

  dan12 00:35 04 Jan 2006

Thanks Diesse,
for your response.
I have a better understanding now than when i asked the question, but going back to the analogy surely if you have a wider road ie more data is going to pass through?
Thanks again for help

  dan12 00:44 04 Jan 2006

Many thanks skills,
for your input as i mentioned am only a begginer and its all a learning curve for me but is nice to know there are people like yourselfs out there to give help and advise.
sometimes as a begginer when asking a question you wonder if its too silly to ask, but your not going to learn if you dont ask the question
am a lot wiser now many thanks

  Skills 19:19 04 Jan 2006

Thats ok we all start somewhere ask away.

With DDR its not so much a wider road its still a single lane but it can send twice as much traffic down that lane.

  DieSse 22:56 04 Jan 2006

*but going back to the analogy surely if you have a wider road ie more data is going to pass through?.

Yes - but DDR is not a *wider road* - it's more akin to the traffic going at twice the speed along the same road.

  DieSse 23:02 04 Jan 2006

*but going back to the analogy surely if you have a wider road ie more data is going to pass through?.

Yes - but DDR is not a *wider road* - it's more akin to the traffic going at twice the speed along the same road.

Of course all electrical signals travel down wires (print on the board) at mre or less the same speed. But data transfers are synchronised with a *clock*.

So you can speed up data transfer in several ways

A faster clock

Transferring more than once on each clock cycle (DDR basically does this - two lots of data for each clock cycle)

More wires simultaneously carrying the data (64 bit busses can carry twice as much data per clock cycle as 32 bit busses, for instance)

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Elsewhere on IDG sites

The Evil Within 2 review-in-progress

InVision Studio takes on Adobe XD and Sketch

Camera tips to take better iPhone photos

Comment transformer un iPhone en borne Wi-Fi ?