Monitor response time can you please advice.?

  last starfighter 22:19 03 Mar 2009
Locked

Hi all im in the proccess of buying one of these for £150 click here

Its 2 months old from a mate, i am not "Gend" up on the responce time thing so is this worth the money & is 3 MS responce time good or bad..?
i dare say i would be playing some games..

  Stuartli 22:23 03 Mar 2009

Best I've seen to date is 2ms, so I wouldn't worry...:-)

  last starfighter 22:30 03 Mar 2009

stuartli thankx, is it the lower the responce rate the better.? or the higher.?

  Stuartli 22:36 03 Mar 2009

The lower the number the better.

  last starfighter 22:38 03 Mar 2009

Thankx stuartli..!!

One VERY last question please, IS 1680x1050 optimal resolution any good cause ive been told its not HD but close.? & will it effect gameplay.?

  ambra4 22:46 03 Mar 2009

Response time is the amount of time a pixel in an LCD monitor takes to go from black to white

and back to black again.

It is measured in milliseconds (ms).

Lower numbers mean faster transitions and therefore fewer visible image artifacts

The time taken for this process varies, but tends to fall somewhere between 2 milliseconds and 5 milliseconds

Screens with long response times will have problems refreshing every element in their pictures

quick enough to keep up with fast motion, resulting in moving objects looking blurred or

‘ghosting’.

With a response time of 3ms is very good most present day monitors are listed at 5ms

The more expensive monitors will list a responses time of 2ms

Even the fastest LCD screens can struggle to show really fast motion clearly.

  Stuartli 22:49 03 Mar 2009

Some guidance (best at present without too much effort!) about response times:

click here

Re the optimal resolution. It's far higher than the 1152x864 I use for my 21in CRT monitor, on which Sky TV's on-line high definition transmissions are very sharp.

In fact my monitor, coupled with a Twinhan Freeview PCI TV tuner, also provides very clear displays from the DTB source.

  Stuartli 22:51 03 Mar 2009

You will note a reference to GTG as well in the link I've provided.

  last starfighter 22:58 03 Mar 2009

MAny thankx ambra4 & stuartli

Thats whats throwing me, you say the lower the number MS is better but then in your link stuartli there is a top of the range monitor with 6 MS..? or is it 12..?

  ambra4 23:12 03 Mar 2009

Maximum Resolution for a 22” widescreen is 1680x1050 and must be set to the correct

resolution for the picture to look right nothing below or above

It no point buying the display and complaining afterwards that the picture look fat and stretch

and you have a black band at the top and bottom of the display; like so many posting I have seen

on this and other forum site

So buy a new graphic card if your present card cannot display 1680 X 1050

Make sure you get the correct type AGP or PCI-e for your motherboard

If you don’t want to replace your display card buy a normal 22” square monitor not a widescreen

Most flat panel monitors use a 60Hertz “Refresh Rate” any other setting you will get a

“Out Of Range Error

You should uninstall the present monitor driver first, shut down the computer, and install the

new display card if your present one need to be replaced, connect the LCD display to the new

display card; power up the computer, access the bios if the present display card is on the

motherboard and change the display setting from PCI to AGP or PCI-e save and reboot the

computer

Windows will load a temporary driver for the new display card; install the driver from the CD

that came with the display card and set the resolution to1680x1050 and a Refresh Rate of

60Hertz

  Stuartli 23:47 03 Mar 2009

It was an older monitor model - it was the explanation of response times that was of value...:-)

ambra4

My quite ancient ATi 9550 graphics card can easily cope with 1680x1050 and, in fact, much higher resolutions.

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