How secure is lastPass for bank details

  catpwss 10:49 11 Jan 2014
Locked

Hi,Just installed the LastPass password manager and it works well on passwords etc.Now on form filling application I have entered my name and address details for instant form filling. Now regarding credit card details would it be secure enough to enter my card details?.Anyone there using this software can you Please pass on some advice on this matter. Many thanks.

  wee eddie 11:06 11 Jan 2014

Don't wish to rain on the show.

However Last Pass, et alia, are as secure as the password you use to access them. So, Last Pass will keep you secure from a "Drive by" intruder to your PC, but will only delay someone who is intent in gaining your details.

  catpwss 15:18 11 Jan 2014

Thanks both. Anybody else please.

  bumpkin 16:26 11 Jan 2014

I would not trust any such software with anything important like bank or credit card details, useful for a lot of other things though. If someone can make it, someone can hack it.

  tullie 17:31 11 Jan 2014

What can be easier than taking the card out of your wallet,once on a secure site?

  morddwyd 19:19 11 Jan 2014

"What can be easier than taking the card out of your wallet,once on a secure site?"

If you happen to have your wallet to hand!

I rarely have my wallet available when on-line shopping.

Life is a compromise.

If you use a password manager, change your master password regularly, every week or so.

  catpwss 19:25 11 Jan 2014

Maybe back to pen and paper then,But reading the last be morddwyd gives another look at the situation. Do I believe that you are saying maybe a good idea to save the CC details in LastPass?,More food for thought.

  AroundAgain 20:15 11 Jan 2014

I use KeePass, much the same as LastPass, and couldn't manage without it. I've used this for years now.

I have to admit that I don't use the auto-fill functions but mainly because I've never taken the time/trouble to work out what you need to do to do this ;)

However, I do 'copy and paste' anything that has to be entered - because I seem to remember that anyone wanting to hack in could interpret keystrokes but not copy and paste. Maybe that's not correct but it sounds possible, I suppose.

I do keep a separate KeePass file for bank details etc, just to be (feel) extra safe and I don't use that file on anything other than my home PC, via an ethernet cable (probably cable not necessary for security, maybe?)

I do use my KeePass on memory stick on occasions but only on friend's machines and I doubt they would know how to access the data after I've gone and before they've re-booted their machine.

Basically, yes, I'd recommend these password managers. Maybe they are not totally un-hackable to those that know how, but in my circles I feel they are secure enough for my use.

I'd be interested to hear what other views, or ensuing discussion, regarding the use / security of password managers.

PS I happen to know a retired Bank Manager, very IT savvy, who uses a password manager, think it's LastPass!!! Surely that must say something towards a recommendation ... ???

:)

  AroundAgain 20:40 11 Jan 2014

I use KeePass, much the same as LastPass, and couldn't manage without it. I've used this for years now.

I have to admit that I don't use the auto-fill functions but mainly because I've never taken the time/trouble to work out what you need to do to do this ;)

However, I do 'copy and paste' anything that has to be entered - because I seem to remember that anyone wanting to hack in could interpret keystrokes but not copy and paste. Maybe that's not correct but it sounds possible, I suppose.

I do keep a separate KeePass file for bank details etc, just to be (feel) extra safe and I don't use that file on anything other than my home PC, via an ethernet cable (probably cable not necessary for security, maybe?)

I do use my KeePass on memory stick on occasions but only on friend's machines and I doubt they would know how to access the data after I've gone and before they've re-booted their machine.

Basically, yes, I'd recommend these password managers. Maybe they are not totally un-hackable to those that know how, but in my circles I feel they are secure enough for my use.

I'd be interested to hear what other views, or ensuing discussion, regarding the use / security of password managers.

PS I happen to know a retired Bank Manager, very IT savvy, who uses a password manager, not sure which one, though. Surely that must say something towards a recommendation ... ???

:)

  AroundAgain 20:41 11 Jan 2014

Oops! Apologies

  rdave13 20:54 11 Jan 2014

Trouble is with password managers is that they are on the PC that you use to do financial transactions on. If the machine is hacked or goes belly up then what do you do? What happens if you forget your master password? Seems like keeping all your eggs in one basket to me.

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