How can I check if my wireless network is secure

  Tommy the Red 23:38 15 May 2007
Locked

Just gone wireless and had to use the helpline to configure everything, must remember to brush up on my punjabi. Anyhow I did request that the network was made secure and I carried out all the instructions accordingly. I was assured that everything was tickety-boo and was also told that I was a "super genius" tell me something I don`t know. A while later the lad asked if we were secure as he had gotten web access on his PSP. A little help please would be much appreciated. TIA TtR

  Strawballs 00:56 16 May 2007

If he just accessed your network without having to put in an encrytion key either WEP (not to secure) or WPA (much better) then you are not secure.

If you access your routers web based setup pages then go to the security section it should say what the security you have setup and what the key is you used.

  Sebastian Ereira 13:07 16 May 2007

If you just accessed your network without having to put in an encrytion key either WEP (not to secure) or WPA (much better) then you are not secure. You might be secure with mac codes. This is still secure.

If you access your routers web based setup pages then go to the security section it should say what the security you have setup and what the key is you used.

  Strawballs 02:38 17 May 2007

Security Myths
There are a couple of wireless security myths that you will often see on the internet. They perpetuate because, on the face of it, they really make sound sense, but there is more to them than that.



Hide your SSID - Your router’s Service Set Identifier (SSID) is simply a name for your wireless network. It was never intended to have any effect on security, but it is often suggested that you should disable its broadcast if the option to do so is available. The truth is, every time a client connects to a router, it includes the SSID in the association message - in clear text, visible to anyone using readily available sniffer software. Switching off the broadcast will only hide your network from casual browsers; the wardrivers will be aware of it, but will be stopped by your encryption. Another factor is that Windows XP’s Wireless Zero Configuration requires SSID broadcast to function properly.



MAC address filtering sounds great in theory. Every network device in the world has a unique MAC address – also known as a physical address - so using it to restrict the devices that can connect to your network sounds like wireless security’s “magic bullet”. There are two major shortcomings in this theory. Firstly, the MAC address is sent in the header of every data packet – unaffected by encryption – and thus is open to sniffer software. Secondly, MAC addresses can easily be spoofed – which also has genuine uses in networking - using readily available software. It’s just too easy, isn’t it?!



By all means, use MAC filtering if you want to - there's no harm in it after all - but be aware that, without encryption, it will just delay a well-equipped and knowledgeable wardriver.

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