Help with PClinuxOS

  Madpad_001 16:21 05 Dec 2008
Locked

I have just installed PCLinuxOS on my system and I am having a few problems:

How do you update programs on the system
I.E Firefox current version is 2.0.0.14. But looking at the firefox site is says 3.0.14 is now a viable but I can't seam to install it.


Thanks in advance

Madpad_001

  woodchip 16:27 05 Dec 2008

Running Linux is not the same as Windows you need to learn to use it as you did with windows using Google for Help on PClinux Note what I typed into Google, change this around to look for things click here=

  woodchip 16:32 05 Dec 2008

This is probable what you need to use click here

  ashdav 17:07 05 Dec 2008

When you get around to updating to Firefox 3, you'll find it installs separately so version 2 will remain.
Mark version 2 for removal first then version 3 will install with all your settings,bookmarks,etc. intact.
The desktop icon is also different but you can change it back to the orange one by right clicking on the desktop icon,select properties,left click once on the icon in the panel and scroll down to the orange icon.

  octal 20:46 05 Dec 2008

You install updates from the Synaptic repository, click on the icon at the bottom as in this picture click here then enter root password then type in Firefox in the search you will find Firefox 3. What ever you do, do not install programs out of the official repositories as by doing that will will likely break the system.

I've been using PCLinuxOS for a few years now and it very rarely goes wrong.

  octal 20:48 05 Dec 2008

Sorry, not a very good link, this one is better click here

  ashdav 21:26 05 Dec 2008

"I've been using PCLinuxOS for a few years now and it very rarely goes wrong."
I've used since it came out and it's never gone wrong.
Totally recommend it.
I'm just waiting for the 2009 update so I can put it on my laptop.Any time now.

  octal 21:52 05 Dec 2008

I should really rephrase that, it rarely goes wrong apart from when I make it go wrong, but to the OP Linux is much easier to repair than Windows.

  LastChip 00:41 06 Dec 2008

All major distros have their own repositories. What that means is, it is a location (a server) for applications (programs) that have proven to work with that particular distro. In some cases, they have been specially compiled or changes have been made to make sure they work and don't give the user any hassles.

When you download and install a new (or updated) application, you install what are known in the Linux world as "packages".

Often, applications need more than one package to work and this is part of the job of the "package manager" - Synaptic.

Synaptic will determine exactly what packages an application needs to work properly. It will then (with the root users authority), download, install and configure those packages, to work seamlessly on your computer. Further, when you ask it to check for updates, it will give you a list of those available and you can accept or decline at your pleasure.

In other words, in Linux, there are no secrets. You are offered the information and you can act on it as you wish. There are no hidden "phone home" files or anything of that nature. It's all up front - what you see is what you get!

If anyone manages to break Linux (and that's no mean feat) it is often because they have downloaded something from outside the official repositories and attempted to compile it themselves. It can be done, but you need to gain some experience first and you should also be aware it introduces some additional (potential) problems.

When you install applications from within Synaptic, it monitors those programs from that moment on. Any updates that are needed, it will tell you about and so on. If you install outside of that environment, Synaptic (not unreasonably) knows nothing about those addition applications and therefore does not track them for required changes. Therefore, there could be changes made to improve stability, or userbility or even a security update which you may be unaware of. So my best advice is at least at first, stay with installing via Synaptic and all should be well.

Welcome to the amazing world of Linux.

  woodchip 14:37 06 Dec 2008

All major distros have their own repositories. What that means is, it is a location (a server) for applications (programs) that have proven to work with that particular distro. In some cases, they have been specially compiled or changes have been made to make sure they work and don't give the user any hassles.


If you look at I think is my Last Link it cuts out all that.

  LastChip 16:42 06 Dec 2008

All your link provides is a "how to" use Synaptic.

It does not explain in the wider Linux context what it is doing and how it is achieved and even if it did, it would not preclude me from offering information on the same subject.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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