Hard Drives

  Iceman1978 11:26 30 Aug 2005
Locked

Why do blank hard drives have a amount of used space? ive just formatted a hard drive but in windows it states that there is 60 odd meg in use. What is this space for?

  Iceman1978 11:35 30 Aug 2005

according to the pc 65meg is taken up by the log file on the hard drive, what is the purpose of the log file?

  DieSse 12:05 30 Aug 2005

A brand new hard drive? - and all you've done is formatted it? (presumably you partitioned it first, too?). And it has a 65 Mb log file?

Did you do this in an already working system with another hard drive? - then presumably the log file has been created by your operating system for it's use.

OS type? - log file name?

  Iceman1978 12:12 30 Aug 2005

Ive had the drive a while my pc went down & i had to format, just wondered what its used for. Does it just keep logging info? im currently using XP.

  Iceman1978 12:14 30 Aug 2005

Ive had the drive a while my pc went down & i had to format, just wondered what its used for. Does it just keep logging info? im currently using XP. Can you access the log file?

  DieSse 12:16 30 Aug 2005

name of file pls ?

  woodchip 12:19 30 Aug 2005

If you have installed it to a XP computer I suggest you stop Restore on that disc as you will lose even more space, you should only need Restore turned on for the Operating System Partition and that could be set as mine at about 8% of drive

  Iceman1978 12:28 30 Aug 2005

Just checked another drive using chkdsk in XP and that has the same amount used for the log file. This must be standard size for all drives using XP. If you use chkdsk in dos it says on the drive information. 65536 KB occupied by the log file. I assume this must be the same for all drives using XP it must be a windows standard. I dont think you can access this area on the hard drive or whether there is any physical name for the file.

  Slithe 16:13 30 Aug 2005

That is to do with a conversion factor - I am not a maths or physics expert. However, the loss is not due to physical space being taken up - but rather a loss due to a conversion from the binary size to the actual GB size of the drive.

For example:

An 120 GB HDD - has a binary capacity of 120GB, however, in reality this is only 111GB.

It's a neat trick played by computer suppliers. However, it works the other way with RAM, hence 1GB of ram is 1024MB instead of 1000GB!

Hope this helps!

  BigMoFoT 16:24 30 Aug 2005

on slithe..

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