cpu fan failed -advice please

  holly polly 19:20 10 Aug 2003
Locked

hi my comp alarm went off ,to tell me that the temp had reached unnacepptable limits ,so i turned off and let it cooled down ,however on bootup i was curious as to the pc health ,so i went into the bios pc health and noticed the cpu fan wasnt running {is this right?}i would have thought it would run all the time,i also noticed that the alarm for cpu fan failure wasnt set ,i reset and yes you guessed the alarm sounded on boot up..
Is my cpu fan cream crackered,and how hard is it too change it -do i have to have the mobo out -would appreciate postings with an idiots guide how to do this task ,as usual all postings greatfully recieved -cheers hol pol...

  Bodi 19:32 10 Aug 2003

Obviously if your CPU fan has failed it is not advisable to run the computer.

If you can remove one side of your computer case and view the CPU & Fan from there, you will be able to see whether the fan is screwed into the top of the Heatsink. There will be screws at each corner. If this is the case, you can gently unscrew these and remove the fan (not forgetting to disconnect the power supply before doing anything). You will, obviously, need to disconnect the fan from the motherboard/power connector. You may then be able to buy and install a new fan. This is the easiest way to do the job.

The alternative is to buy a new heatsink and fan (both come together)but the spring clip which holds these to the motherboard can be fiddly and difficult to remove and install. If you are brave enough, you will need a flat screwdriver which should fit into little slots on the spring clip. You will need to press the spring clip down firmly - taking care not to slip and scratch the motherboard. To install a new hs/fan, you will need to hook the spring clip onto the little lugs again.

Bodi

  Bodi 19:50 10 Aug 2003

I usually prefer to have the motherboard on a flat surface (out of the case) to fit a heatsink and fan, because the area around the CPU may not be supported. Some motherboards have four holes around the CPU socket, into which you can insert nylon/plastic supports and this help support the huge heatsinks in modern motherboards.

If you feel unsure about fitting these, try taking your computer to your local shop, and they can also test to see if any damage has been done to your CPU. Make sure they have a decent reputation and won't rip you off by suggesting a new CPU if you don't need one.

Bodi

  -pops- 19:51 10 Aug 2003

If this is the thread you have raised as an alternative to your previous one click here I ought to point out that a CPU fan is not integral to the CPU but is a completely different unit most likely from a different manufacturer. A failed fan is not a failure on the part of the CPU.

  holly polly 21:35 10 Aug 2003

all points noted many thanks incidently pops why did you post a link to my previous thread when listed as resolved?my annology is no more than anyone else we are all mere mortals lol,or is it that you drive a lada? lol.joking apart many thanks to all who posted...-hol pol...

  holly polly 21:37 10 Aug 2003

oops wrong title my apologies ,you see pops i am mortal...

  Bodi 21:40 10 Aug 2003

Don't understand - what has an Epson C82 printer got to do with a failed CPU fan?

Also the reference to the other thread - is there a link somewhere that I missed?

Bodi

  holly polly 21:54 10 Aug 2003

ok brodi dont concern your self the printer was my error my apologies been helping someone on another thread ,in refrence to the other thread it was pops having a go at me ,thanks for the input and all who posted -cheers hol pol,

  -pops- 06:18 11 Aug 2003

I wasn't having a go at you. I was trying to make a comment about another thread which you appeared to close abruptly when you weren't getting replies you expected.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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