AOL and Wireless Connection

  Taff36 08:19 14 May 2005
Locked

Friend of mine has just signed up for Broadband with AOL and received his package on Thursday. Because he lives in a flat he doesnt want cables running throughout and he can`t put the computer where the master BT socket is. (In the lounge) He has a new desktop system and, because he travels internationally and often away for several months he has a wireless enabled laptop. His wife can therefore e-mail him.

I have set up a wireless ADSL router and a home wireless network so the two computers can transfer files successfully between them however AOL tell me that they cannot accept the wireless router connection unless he upgrades from their £17.99 (Bronze Service?) to their £24.99 Gold Service. What a rip off.

He has used AOL for years and so does his company and he is reluctant to lose his AOL e-mail address but even he says that to pay another £7 a month for a service when he could be away from home for 6 months of the year is a bit much.

Any way I can beat their system?

  Dart Echo 10:37 14 May 2005

I think it can be done.

Back when we were all on 512 and AOL were saying they did not support networking some people took that to mean you could not connect to AOL using a router. It did not mean that really. What that really meant was that you could not go to them for help. And that's the message you are getting.
Even now they only "support" XP on networking and I've used WinMe since it was launched. These AOL help-people are not very techy. They work to set scripts and their information base is rather restricted. I like AOL, used it for over four years but you would not let one of their people loose with your mouse, never mind your machine.

I've had three machines connecting via AOL for a long time time now, albeit wired, and it cannot make any difference what speed range you are on. A router is a router is a router.

All you need to do is to discover your TCP/IP addresses etc, and set up your machine and router accordingly in the normal way. There's no big trick or secret to doing this. Just go ahead as you normally would for any ISP. The ISP is irrelevent to the exercise.

Hope this helps.

  Taff36 11:16 14 May 2005

They seemed to say that the ability to do this was not "switched on" at their end but I see what you`re saying. What do you mean by discover your TCP/IP addresses. I know how to access TCP/IP but what am I looking to change if anything?

  Taff36 11:55 14 May 2005

They seemed to say that the ability to do this was not "switched on" at their end but I see what you`re saying. What do you mean by discover your TCP/IP addresses. I know how to access TCP/IP but what am I looking to change if anything?

  Taff36 21:43 14 May 2005

Bump

Does anyone have a wireless router using AOL who can give me the router settings?

  Taff36 17:52 15 May 2005

Bump

  Taff36 22:31 16 May 2005

Bump

Apparently BT say the same, they charge extra for a wiFi Router connection. Has anyone heard of this before? Surely as has been said a connection is a connection is a connection?

  Taff36 08:12 06 Jun 2005

Dart Echo was right. After three calls to their helpline it became obvious that AOL only "support" the routers they supply. You get nowhere with them as soon as you say you are using any other. We basically got each of the computers running with their router and software. Then simply set up the wireless network and internet connection on our router using the AOL settings from their "Expert Settings" which you can find from a dialog box when you log on. What a rip off AOL - and you nearly lost a customer because of it!

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