Adding A Secondary Hard Drive

  gcs_uk 15:52 05 May 2003
Locked

I have decided to buy and install a second hard drive. I only have 20gb capacity and want to increase this to about 80gb.

However (as usual) I have a few questions.

(1) From looking inside my machine there is no spare power leads. I used the only spare one when I installed my CD/RW. Is it possible to connect new ones or am I missing something blindingly obvious.

(2) My current hard drive is a MAXTOR 4K020H1 now is there any one specific type I should be looking for? Or can I buy any hard drive to work alongside it.

TIA

you can split one of the other power leads with a "Y Splitter" for just a few pence, it would be advisable to try and split it so that the two things arent running at the sme time, make sure your power supply is powerful enough to cover your needs.

as to the second question just buy the best hard drive you can afford but there is a lot to be said for sticking to the same brand for peaceful coexistance. (insist on 80 conductor cables)
GOOD LUCK

  SEASHANTY 16:45 05 May 2003

If you want to make things easy buy a retail boxed drive. The Maxtor boxed ones come with the Maxblast Plus installation disk and all the relevant screws, fittings and the 80 wire IDE cable. It makes fitting the new drive a whole lot easier. If you purchase a cheaper OEM drive that's all you will get - just the bare drive.

  gcs_uk 16:52 05 May 2003

you can split one of the other power leads with a "Y Splitter" for just a few pence, it would be advisable to try and split it so that the two things arent running at the sme time, make sure your power supply is powerful enough to cover your needs.
as to the second question just buy the best hard drive you can afford but there is a lot to be said for sticking to the same brand for peaceful coexistance. (insist on 80 conductor cables) GOOD LUCK

Thanks to both of you for the info. HOwever, I have a question about the Y Splitter.

What do u mean when u say make sure the two things arent running at the same time - how can i manage that ? Also how can i know if my power supply is powerful enough for my needs ?
Finally what do you mean by "80 conductor cables".

TIA

what i meant is to pick two things that are unlikely to be drawing power at the same time, its actually not that important so dont sweat but if you have say a cd-rom drive and your cd-rw drive you are unlikely to be using them at the same time so they wont draw power at the same time. i'm a little worried that your psu may not be powerful enough if it didnt have sufficient extra molex connectors anyway. as i say dont worry i dont think you're on the road to a disaster.

happy days H.

  SEASHANTY 16:37 06 May 2003

You will prob find that your present 20GB disk has a spindle speed of 5400 rpm and this most likely is connected by a 40 wire cable to the IDE socket on the motherboard. Many of the newer drives today run at 7200 rpm and require an 80 conductor flat IDE cable for connection from the drive to the motherboard. This is why I suggest you buy a retail boxed drive as it will have the correct cable included in the box with the installation software which will do the configuring for you. As horiz5 stated you may find yourself limited by the main power supply if its only 200 or 250 watts you may have to change it for a 300 watt unit. Cost about £30 - £35. A hard drive takes about 0.5 amps @ 5V and 1 amp at 12 volts from the power supply and even more than this at startup - hence the power concern if you have all your PCI slots full and a power hungry graphics card installed. You will be given the option to stagger the hard drive by delaying its start up when you install the drive. You will also have the option of transferring all the info on your 20GB to the new drive, if you so wish, and using that as master.

  gcs_uk 18:04 06 May 2003

Thanks for all the information - I am glad I asked.

I will definitely by buying a retail boxed drive - I must admit I was tempted at first to buy an OEM drive - but at my level of expertise and technological know how it would be a false economy.

Once again thanks.

  gcs_uk 21:30 06 May 2003

horiz5 said that it would be best for me to make sure any secondary drive is a Maxtor make - whilst I understand the reason for this I wonder how many people have actually had problems after they have installed a second hard drive of a different manufacturer.

I only ask this as I have seen some 40gb hard drives for about £35.00 but there are manufactured by companies of which I have never heard of.

I will probably end up erring on the side of caution and buying a maxtor drive but I wonder what other people think.

i went back into the books and in fact i dont think that you will run into a problem, the conflicts i had in mind only really arise in older drives that werent fully ATA compliant.

buying the retail version is good idea if only to get the right screws.

  gcs_uk 01:59 07 May 2003

Thanks for that

  Megatyte 03:04 07 May 2003

You can install any drive you like, but you will not go far wrong with a Maxtor. As for running both drives at the same time off a splitter there is no problem at all. All power cables from the PSU come from the same terminals and the cable that you are splitting is more than adequately rated for multiple drives.

AH

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