Lifespan of Digital Cameras

  thegreypanther 22:53 29 Mar 2006
Locked

Is there a finite lifespan for the sensor in a digital camera?
My first digital camera, a Fuji 4900, lasted me for 3 years. After several thousand exposures, occasional images became noticeably "clumpy" in the shadow areas and seemed to take on a slight magenta cast in these areas.
I have now owned a Canon EOS300D for over two years, and over 7000 images later I believe that it is beginning to display the same symptoms.
Is it just my imagination, or do digital cameras begin to wear out after heavy usage over several years?

  hssutton 23:04 29 Mar 2006

I guess almost everything as a finite life including the sensor of digital cameras, but my 300D is fast approaching 30,000 images and they're still as sharp as they ever where.

Even my old EOS D2000 which has taken in excess of 50,000 inages is showing no signs of problems apart from the LCD getting a little dim/

  Arnie 01:13 30 Mar 2006

Should not be affected with normal use.
Leaving the camera in a car during summer temperatures could possibly cause some general deterioration of the mechanics. (Zoom mechanisms etc).
The lubricants may evaporate which would cause some friction between the operating surfaces.

CCDs, produce small charges corresponding to the light that falls on them. It is not a good idea to point a digital camera directly at the sun. This would certainly reduce the operating life the device, even though the electronic shutter would tend to stop down the light entering the CCD via the lens.

Sensible care of the camera should result in a reasonable life expectancy.

  dms05 08:53 30 Mar 2006

I had an early CMOS digital camera and after a couple of years the sensor was definitely unusable. I now have a Nikon and that seems to be lasting better. I even have a camera in my Siemens mobile and that seems resiliant. I always think the actual exposures are not a factor - 1,000 exposures at 1/250th is only 4 seconds! How long do you spend composing on the TFT screen? I'm sure that's much more relevant to the sensor life in most digital cameras.

In the days of 35mm film Olympus reckoned most of their cameras had 1*36exp film through them each year and so their cameras only need to last for 200 exposures to seem like very reliable cameras. Of course most SLR's lasted much longer but I'm not sure about Compacts!

  amonra 13:00 30 Mar 2006

In today's throwaway society nothing is designed to last. Planned obsolescence is the buzzword. Last year's 3MP camera is now outdated by this year's 6MP model, we dont stand a chance !
But honestly, I think 3 years is a good lifetime for a camera, it's time to upgrade anyway.
By that I meant digital camera, my 2 old SLR film models are still going strong after yonks, but not used all that often. Digital is far more convenient and the results are getting better !

  hssutton 17:35 01 Apr 2006

"In the days of 35mm film Olympus reckoned most of their cameras had 1*36exp film through them each year and so their cameras only need to last for 200 exposures to seem like very reliable cameras. Of course most SLR's lasted much longer but I'm not sure about Compacts!"

More photographs in 12 hours with a DSLR than most SLRs manage in a liftime.

Spotted the following in a Canon forum.

two weeks ago I shot 20 000 pictures within 12 hours. basically I just kept the shutter button pressed since that was the only way I knew how to take pictures of dozens of competitive ballroom dancers, all competing at the same time, constantly changing their routines with new pairs replacing old ones every few minutes or so. I've selected some 500 pictures from the lot and you can see them here:
click here


Harry

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