What's the Most Powerful PC?

  lex_davies 06:41 08 Nov 2003
Locked

Hi i want to buy a computer and money is no object. What are the current top line products for components, software and so on? I've surfed the net and researched what i think is the best stuff that money can buy. I don't like customising a PC from a manufacturers site as there is usally limited options and would cost more than if you bought them seperatly.

At the moment the items listed below are the front runners for my dream machine, but if any one could give me advice on what really are the fastest and most powerful components and stuff i would be grateful. I do a lot of digital and video editing so speed, graphics and realibilty is the key for me. I work from the office but i am going it alone and becoming self employed my current 3 year old home pc i got is not up to the task heck watching a dvd on it is hard work. So i need something pretty quick. If there's a web link or something that could lead me in the right direction it would be welcome.

Processor
Intel P4 3.2 512Kb S478 Box 800FSB

Mother Board
Gigabyte S478 Intel 875P ATX A L R S

USB Port
Belkin Belkin USB2/Firewire Card

Memory (RAM)
Crucial Technology 1GB 184DIMM PC2100 NP CL2.5

Operating system
Windows XP Pro

Hard disk capacity
Western Digital Caviar 250GB SATA150

Video card
Gainward CoolFX GeForce FX5900Ultra 256MB DDR AGP RP DVI VO

Monitor
BenQ FP991 19" LCD Monitor

CD
Teac CD-RW 52r 52w 24rw Int IDE RP

DVD-ROM drive
Sony DRU-510A DVD+/-RW Internal

Common items
Keyboard - Microsoft Natural Multimedia Keyboard, Mouse - Microsoft Optical Mouse Blue, Floppy disk drive - Sony 1.44MB Internal 3.5", Inkjet Printer - HP PhotoSmart PSC 2510 WIFI Print Copy Scanner, Modem - Linksys Wireless-Ready ADSL Modem and Router, Sound card - Creative Audigy 2 ZS Platinum Pro PCI, Speakers - Creative Megaworks THX 5.1 550, Headphones/Headset - Plantronics Audio 90

  powerless 07:51 08 Nov 2003

Your letting your sound down, a 7.1 soundcard with 5.1 speakers? Creative do now have 7.1 speakers.

Their is now a 5950Ultra. Not sure if it is water cooled.

You RAM speed is one of the lowest, 2100, newer and faster 3200 (400Mhz). Some memory is now @ 500Mhz. This is DDR memory; ever considered faster RDRAM?

250GB SATA150 - What about faster scsi hard drives? Go for two hard drives, maybe an External USB one?

  BeForU 08:28 08 Nov 2003

you could also be brave and go for the new AMD Athlon 64 bit CPUs as they are quite fast if not much faster than the P2 3.2 from what ive been reading!

  BeForU 08:30 08 Nov 2003

also id probably go for a ATI Radeon 9800 Pro XT than a Nvidia 5950 FX Ultra! although some tests report the new Nvidia card coming out is more powerful than ATI's latest but id still go for ATI anyday!

  Stuartli 08:36 08 Nov 2003

The one that comes out just a few days after you've splashed out on the latest and greatest - usually not only with a superior specification but also a price drop...:-)

In other words, if you want the most powerful system it's always just around the corner.

Just buy the best you can afford for the task you require it and enjoy it now.

  Forum Editor 08:51 08 Nov 2003

runs one of the country's leading video and multi-media production companies, and he tells me that an excellent option for someone starting out on their own would be a dual processor PowerMac G5. Later on you'll probably want to spend a good deal more on a purpose-built work station, but for the time being the PowerMac would get you going.

Here's the standard spec:

Dual 2GHz PowerPC G5
?1GHz frontside bus
?512K L2 cache
?512MB DDR400 128-bit SDRAM, Expandable to 8GB SDRAM
?160GB Serial ATA
?SuperDrive
?Three PCI-X Slots
?ATI Radeon 9600 Pro with 64MB DDR video memory
?56K internal modem

That machine will cost you a couple of thousand pounds without a monitor, and if you're really serious about video you'll need to add at least a 20" cinema display, which will set you back another thousand pounds - or sixteen hundred for the ultimate 23" display - although for serious work you'll need three monitors.

Add another couple of thousand or more for software and you'll find that this setup will total up at around five and a half thousand pounds, and that's just with one monitor.

On the other hand.............

If your 'money no object' statement still holds good you might take a peek at the Poweroid 9220.

This monster of a PC weighs in at ?4111.33 inc VAT (That doesn't include a monitor - you'll need three of those by the way) and has a specification that's tailor-made for your work. It's driven by two Intel Xeon 3.06 GHz processors, and has:

Dual Hyperthreading (a bit like having 4 x CPUs)

Matrox RT.X100 Xtreme Professional editing package

2 GB ECC Registered DDR RAM

Server motherboard for extra reliability

SCSI hard disk for the fastest speeds

Total over 500 GB of storage

Multi-format DVD Writer

Adobe Premiere Pro

DVDit to publish to DVD

Adobe After Effects

Composite and S-Video inputs and outputs via external break out box included. The video card is the 128MB MATROX Parhelia, which supports three monitors.

Add monitors, bits and pieces of software and hardware, and you'll be staring eight to ten thousand pounds or so in the face.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 09:50 08 Nov 2003

...so my Evesham 350Mhz is not really a contender then? Looks like it will be Aldi on the 27th November ;-))

G

  lex_davies 10:53 08 Nov 2003

>>
My brother
runs one of the country's leading video and multi-media production companies, and he tells me that an excellent option for someone starting out on their own would be a dual processor PowerMac G5. Later on you'll probably want to spend a good deal more on a purpose-built work station, but for the time being the PowerMac would get you going.
Here's the standard spec:

Dual 2GHz PowerPC G5 ?1GHz frontside bus ?512K L2 cache ?512MB DDR400 128-bit SDRAM, Expandable to 8GB SDRAM ?160GB Serial ATA ?SuperDrive ?Three PCI-X Slots ?ATI Radeon 9600 Pro with 64MB DDR video memory ?56K internal modem

That machine will cost you a couple of thousand pounds without a monitor, and if you're really serious about video you'll need to add at least a 20" cinema display, which will set you back another thousand pounds - or sixteen hundred for the ultimate 23" display - although for serious work you'll need three monitors.

Add another couple of thousand or more for software and you'll find that this setup will total up at around five and a half thousand pounds, and that's just with one monitor.

On the other hand.............

If your 'money no object' statement still holds good you might take a peek at the Poweroid 9220.

This monster of a PC weighs in at ?4111.33 inc VAT (That doesn't include a monitor - you'll need three of those by the way) and has a specification that's tailor-made for your work. It's driven by two Intel Xeon 3.06 GHz processors, and has:

Dual Hyperthreading (a bit like having 4 x CPUs)

Matrox RT.X100 Xtreme Professional editing package

2 GB ECC Registered DDR RAM

Server motherboard for extra reliability

SCSI hard disk for the fastest speeds

Total over 500 GB of storage

Multi-format DVD Writer

Adobe Premiere Pro

DVDit to publish to DVD

Adobe After Effects

Composite and S-Video inputs and outputs via external break out box included. The video card is the 128MB MATROX Parhelia, which supports three monitors. Add monitors, bits and pieces of software and hardware, and you'll be staring eight to ten thousand pounds or so in the face

<< Hi thanks for that, i've got a five figure start up loan from the bank it's a risky venture but one i'm sure will pay off. I've always had an interest in digital and video editing ever since i worked on my first pc in primary school. I'm at a loss though with how fast the computing industry moves, one month something reigns supreme the next it's relegated out of the top ten. When i will be spending that much on a product i want to know that it is up to the job not just now but 5 years down the line. I will defiantly be considering the poweroid 9220 i just found it on
click here and it looks like a cracking piece of machineary. The components i stated would have cost around ?5k anyways so already this forum as proved a good bet for sound advice. A bit wary about the monitors though i've heard the benq FP991 19" LCD Monitor is a good buy but will be keeping options open.

  spuds 13:22 08 Nov 2003

The one that as not been designed and built yet,that's my answer.Whatever you buy this month, something will improve on next months model.

Take NASA Space Research Center for instance, they have a mega buck/dollar budget, but they still use obsolete floppies.

Taking all in consideration, buy what you can really afford, with the most professional and technical back-up available.Nothing like running out of funds, when technical problems occure.Especially when you start on the long road of self employment.

  Stuartli 17:56 08 Nov 2003

Five years down the line.....?

Six to 12 months down the line it will probably seem sluggish compared to newcomers.

What will be with us in five years' time is almost impossible to calculate but it will definitely be truly awesome compared to today.

Just think back to the systems that were the latest and greatest in 1998..:-)

  bremner 18:19 08 Nov 2003

click here, not too personal and no price mentioned, on the upside it should have no problem with your video work though

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Elsewhere on IDG sites

Galaxy Note 8 vs iPhone X

Awful clip art from 1994 is being tweeted every hour by a bot

iPhone X vs Samsung Galaxy Note 8

Les meilleurs navigateurs internet 2017