The Xbox One is a pretty powerful piece of kit right out of the box, but for those who want a bit more from it there are plenty of ways to enhance the gaming experience and make the most of the amazing Xbox One game library. From customisable controllers to high-end headsets, here are the best Xbox One accessories around.

We've collected a few of the best accessories out there for the console right now, and we'll be adding to this article as new products are released and updating our recommendations, so be sure to check back often.

Xbox One Stereo Headset

Xbox One Stereo Headset
  • RRP: £39.99, 59.99

There are plenty of headsets available for the Xbox One, but Microsoft’s official offering is a great place to start for a few reasons. First up, at just £36 on Amazon UK at the moment it’s very competitively priced for a decent quality stereo headset with a mic, while the minimalist Xbox aesthetic is a big step up from the more garish options out there from most gaming accessory manufacturers.

There’s another advantage to buying the official cans: they come packaged with a Stereo Headset Adapter. This is important if you have an older Xbox One, which might not include a 3.5mm audio port on the controller, but it’s useful even if you have a more recent controller, as it adds controls to adjust volume, mute the mic, and alter the balance between game and chat audio directly to the controller.

Alternatively, you can always buy another headset (or use one you already own) and just pick up the Stereo Headset Adapter on its own for £15.99 from Amazon.

Xbox One Elite Wireless Controller

Xbox One Elite Wireless Controller
  • RRP: £119.99, US$149.99

The price may give you pause for thought, but if you’re looking for an extra competitive edge online or simply want to tweak the finer details of your gaming experience, there’s good reason to consider the upgrade.

Alongside the slick black-and-chrome finish, the Elite controller boasts Hair Trigger Locks for faster firing in shooters, additional paddles on the back for more control options, and fully interchangeable thumbsticks and D-pads. An accompanying app lets you remap the controls for even more flexibility, and it comes with its own carry case with space for all the interchangeable components.

The only downside? It still feels silly to be paying around £100 and getting a controller that relies on AA batteries, which brings us onto our next favourite Xbox One accessory.

Xbox One Play and Charge Kit

Xbox One Play and Charge Kit
  • RRP: £19.99, US$24.99

It’s frankly a bit confusing that Microsoft hasn’t yet released an official Xbox One controller with a rechargeable battery. Then again, a cynic might suggest that it’s for a simple enough reason: to drive up sales of its own Play and Charge Kit, which replaces the existing AA battery slot with a rechargeable battery.

Whatever Microsoft’s motivations, if you want to ditch the AAs without switching over to a third-party controller, this is your best bet. A four-hour charge should provide 30 hours of playtime, and you can carry on using the controller while it charges over the included USB-to-Micro-USB cable.

Xbox One Recon Tech Controller

Xbox One Recon Tech Controller
  • RRP: £59.99, US$69.99

Microsoft is expanding its already broad range of Xbox One controllers with a limited edition Tech Series, featuring a variety of different controller variants with slightly different innards, aesthetics, and inspirations. 

First out of the gate is the Recon Tech Special Edition. "Inspired by military technology and performance patterns," the chief technical innovation is that it supposedly boasts up to twice the wireless range of previous Xbox One pads, along with the now-standard Bluetooth so that you can connect up to a PC, Mac, or tablet too.

There's also a textured diamond rubberized grip on the back of the controller to make it more comfortable for extended gameplay sessions, while the front boasts a gold accented design that doesn't exactly scream 'military recon', but does look pretty cool.

Horipad Pro

Horipad Pro
  • RRP: £34.99, US$49.99

If the price of the Xbox Elite controller makes you wince, you might want to give the Horipad Pro a look. It's not as slick, it's not as glossy, and it's not as customisable, but it offers some of the same functionality at a cheaper price than even the default Xbox One pad.

The Horipad boasts four extra trigger buttons on the back that you can quickly assign functions to, using them as a convenient way to access the face buttons without taking your thumb off the right control stick. You can also use them together with the D-pad to mute your mic or adjust headset volume through the in-built 3.5mm jack. 

It's strictly wired (though that means no battery woes) and includes rumble. Build quality is generally pretty high (and the D-pad is a clear improvement on the Xbox One default), though it's definitely built for smaller hands. Overall, it's a solid choice for any competitive players who can't stretch their budget as far as the Elite.

PDP Talon Media Remote

PDP Talon Media Remote
  • RRP: £25, US$19.99

Official or unofficial, wired or unwired, rechargeable or AA, one thing remains constant about the console controller: it’s a rubbish replacement for a TV remote. Which would be fine, except that these days you’re as likely to be using your Xbox for browsing Netflix or playing Blu-rays as you are actually playing games.

Microsoft has somewhat remedied this with the official Xbox One Media Remote, but it’s pretty feature-light, and missing obvious buttons like Eject and Power. By contrast, the PDP Talon Media Remote boasts all the controls you’d expect from a full remote, along with backlit buttons, and a D-pad and A,B,X,Y buttons.

The only problem is that PDP don’t ship outside North America, but thankfully it’s pretty easy to grab one on eBay for roughly £20 - just about the same price as Microsoft’s own barebones equivalent.

Seagate Game Drive

Seagate Game Drive
  • RRP: £99.99, US$99.99

Unlike the PlayStation 4, the Xbox One doesn’t give you the option to easily swap out the console’s internal hard drive. That means that if you fill up the default drive you’ll have to pick up an external one to give yourself space to expand your game collection.

In theory, just about any external drive should work, but Seagate’s Game Drive is the only one designed specifically with the Xbox One in mind. That brings two benefits: first up the guarantee that it will be compatible, and fast enough to run games smoothly; and second the only-slightly-lurid Xbox branding so it won’t look out of place sitting next to the console itself.

It’s available in 2TB and 4TB mechanical drives, or a 512GB SSD. You do pay a bit of premium for the official association though, so bear in mind there are cheaper drives out there - especially when it comes to the SSD, which Amazon is selling for an eye-watering £290.