We didn't think things could get much better than 2016's Tom Clancy's The Division, Dark Souls III, Uncharted 4, Doom and Overwatch, but that was just the start. 2017 promises even more - check out our most anticipated games to find out what's on the way.

We've played each and every game in this round-up, and have reviewed all of them to help you decide whether they're your cup of tea. We've got everything from solo adventure games to huge online open worlds, as well as fighting games, shooting games, racing games and more.

If you want to find out about the best games beyond your PS4, check out our guides to the best Xbox One games and the finest PC games.

Read on to find out which games the Tech Advisor Gaming team are loving right now, and be sure to share your favourite games in the comments section below or via Facebook and Twitter.

Horizon Zero Dawn

Horizon Zero Dawn
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Horizon Zero Dawn is one of the most highly anticipated games of 2017, exclusive to the PS4 and PS4 Pro. But what makes the post-apocalyptic open world of Horizon Zero Dawn so attractive? Apart from roaming mechanical dinosaurs and a fiery red-headed heroine, of course.

The game’s storyline is much like a Hollywood movie with an engaging and intriguing storyline: after proving herself worthy to those that labelled her an outcast as a child, it’s up to Aloy to unmask the secrets of her past and in doing so, shed some light on why the world it is as it is, and where the mysterious dinosaur-like Machines are coming from.

Now, combine that with extended cut scenes and a game where every frame could be a painting and you’ve got something that’s engaging, gorgeous and hands down one of the best games to grace the PS4 ever.

Frankly, what’s most impressive about Horizon Zero Dawn is that it’s powered by a PS4, and not a high-end gaming PC. This is especially true when running Horizon Zero Dawn on a PS4 Pro, as we did, offering a 4K output at 30fps by rendering the game in 2160p checkerboard.

Lines are clear and defined, textures are of an extremely high quality and the frame rate is stable while providing one of the greatest gaming experiences available on a console. We take our hats off to you, Guerrilla Games, we really do.

Read more in our Horizon Zero Dawn review

The Last Guardian

The Last Guardian
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We had to wait nine years, and it managed to somehow skip the PS3 entirely, but it was worth it: The Last Guardian is the sort of exclusive that should make anyone without a PS4 very jealous indeed.

The latest game from the creator of Ico and Shadow of the Colossus sees you play as a young boy tasked with escaping a derelict castle. Your only companion? A giant, magical, half-bird, half-cat creature named Trico, who you'll have to befriend and help if you want to make it out in one piece.

Across the game's platforming, puzzles, and fights, it's that bond with Trico that'll keep you coming back for more, as you slowly build up trust between the two of you, until by the end of the game you're happily plunging off teetering towers, confident that the big fluffball will catch you on your way down.

There are a few performance issues and occasional frustrations with the controls, but The Last Guardian is beautiful - and emotional - enough that you're not likely to care. 

Read more in our full The Last Guardian review.

Final Fantasy 15

Final Fantasy 15
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At 200 hours for a complete playthrough (and at least 40 for the main story alone), Final Fantasy XV is pretty undeniable value for money- luckily, it's also a good enough game that you'll probably want to stick around for all 200 of those hours.

The game sets you on a road trip with a few buddies, but since this is a Final Fantasy game, there's obviously a lot more to the story than that, and it's packed with all the requisite twists and turns to keep you engaged throughout.

FFXV shakes up the series' turn-based combat with a new dynamic, real-time system that lets you perform joint attacks with your teammates. It takes a little getting used to, but once you do it's effective, intuitive, and above all fun.

The open world lets you travel just about as far as the eye can see, and visit everything along the way, and the game world is packed with activities and side quests to keep you occupied.

Read more in our full Final Fantasy XV review and our favourite FFXV tips and tricks.

South Park: The Fractured But Whole

South Park: The Fractured But Whole
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South Park: The Fractured But Whole once again puts you in the shoes of the New Kid, the newest resident in the 2.5D world of South Park. Like 2014’s The Stick of Truth, The Fractured But Whole is an RPG game, but this time Cartman and his friends have traded in their wooden swords of the Dungeons and Dragons-themed game for super powers in this superhero-themed title.

If you like South Park, you’re going to love The Fractured But Whole. Besides exploring the 2D world we’ve watched on TV for 20 years, the game features endless hat-tilts to characters and plots in previous episodes of South Park. You’ll come across memberberries (remember those?) and classic characters like Towelie and Mr Hanky, and will get to fight everyone from the Raisins girls to Kyle’s 'mom', Sheila Broflovski.

Turn-based combat provides the possibility of strategic play, but gameplay rarely calls for anything that tactical. Still though, it's fun to throw bogeys and fart in sixth-graders faces!

Read more in our full South Park: The Fractured But Whole review

Call of Duty: WW2

Call of Duty: WW2
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Call of Duty WW2 takes the CoD franchise back to its roots. During the campaign you’ll storm the beaches of Normandy on D-Day before fighting your way across Europe, experiencing events of the second world war including the Battle of the Bulge and The Rhine through the eyes of a solider.

Clocking in at around six hours of play time, the intense campaign is packed with intense close-quarters combat and spectacular events, all enhanced with impressive sound design and incredible visuals. It’s a stunning game with detailed environments – even the facial animations are detailed.

The multiplayer boasts 10 diverse maps across Europe, featuring maps with tight corners and enclosed areas perfect for shotguns or submachine guns to open maps ideal for patient snipers. A big change is the removal of Classes. They’ve been replaced with Divisions, each with unique unlockable benefits like SMG suppressors or bayonet charges.

But while the changes are welcome, we can’t help but feel it’s a little underwhelming compared to other games like Battlefield 1 with huge multiplayer modes and various vehicles to use, especially with CoD’s 12-player limit.

There’s also a Nazi Zombies mode with a great new co-op campaign mode, featuring an original story separate from the campaign.

Read more in our full Call of Duty: WW2 review

Mass Effect: Andromeda

Mass Effect: Andromeda
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In 2185, humans stumbled across a Martian ruin that projected their understanding of science and technology forward by hundreds of years, making space travel a reality.Appealing to adventurers, scientists and those that wanted a fresh start, the Andromeda Initiative took thousands of humans across the galaxy on a 600-year trip to the Heleus Cluster, nestled comfortably within the Andromeda galaxy.

Of course, not everything goes to plan. As the Pathfinder, you're tasked with exploring many planets to locate a 'golden world' for the human race to settle on. You'll come across aliens both friendly and hostile, and thanks to the multiple conversation choices available, the story and how others view you are effected by the choices you make.

Couple that with amazingly smooth combat mechanics and a roster of bionic powers available, and you've got yourself a thoroughly enjoyable space exploration game with thoroughly enjoyable third-person combat. 

Of course, the facial expressions need a bit of work, but if you can look beyond that, Mass Effect: Andromeda provides a galaxy that looks absolutely stunning, offering tens if not hundreds of hours of gameplay.

Read our Mass Effect Andromeda review

For Honor

For Honor
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For Honor has the potential to be the best hack-and-slash style fighting game of 2017 with players taking on the roll of either a Knight, Viking or Samurai in intense close-quarters war-based combat. 

What you'll get for your money is a three-tier story that puts gamers in control of the The Legion (Knights), The Warborn (Vikings) and The Chosen (Samurais) at various stages in their ongoing battle. It's an interesting way to get the perspective of all involved in the war, and also provides a great way to try out all the different heroes available before heading online for PVP-based fun. 

There are different classes of warrior available, each with their own moveset, weapons and fighting styles, and it's up to you to find what best suits your style. What we must admit that the battle mechanics do take a while to get used to as they're unlike any game we've played in recent years, but with experience you'll be able to perform incredible combos and over the top executions. 

Though there's an element of brute force to the game, there's a lot of tactic and skill required to do well in For Honor, both in the offline story and in the online multiplayer. Pair that with a variety of ways to customise each of your warriors (both visually and in terms of skills) and you're left with a hack-and-slash fighting game that you'll come back to time and time again. 

Sniper Elite 4

Sniper Elite 4
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The Sniper Elite franchise is famous for providing fans with a satisfying sniper-based shooter, and that’s not changing with Sniper Elite 4. While it’s much the same as previous games in the series, it comes with a handful of changes and improvements that take Sniper Elite from being a good sniper game, to one of the best.

Described as a “sniper’s paradise”, Sniper Elite 4 is focused more on gameplay than story – and it’s a smart choice too. In terms of sniper gameplay, Sniper Elite 4 is hands-down one of the best games we’ve ever played, with no game providing more satisfaction as you ping the helmets off the heads of your enemies from over 200m away. Those who want a Sniper sim aren’t interested in deep, brooding storylines and emotional protagonists, they just want to camp and headshot Nazis – what’s so bad about that?

The addition of climbing mechanics and environments that are three times larger than previous games provide a plethora of different ways to tackle your objectives, whether it be all-out chaos with exploding vehicles or a stealthy takedown from a far-away snipers nest. If you're looking for a new, challenging shooter, look no further than Sniper Elite 4. 

Read more in our Sniper Elite 4 review.

DOOM

DOOM
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Instead of launching a sequel to the somewhat disappointing DOOM 3, Bethesda has taken things a step back and launched a complete reboot of the 1993 original and it's exciting, fast-paced, relentless action from the get-go.

You're thrown straight in at the deep end and forced to learn quickly, with non-stop action and next to no storytelling. It's all about brutal, chaotic and gory fighting.

The environments are detailed, with strategically placed power-ups and secret paths, making a compelling and increasingly difficult arena-style game.

Combat is intense, with little or no cover and no health regeneration, so you'll need to dive in and think on your feet. It's during these adrenaline-filled battles that the real beauty of DOOM reveals itself – the beauty of pure chaos.

Weapon customisation is a key part of DOOM, and you can upgrade your suit too.

The DOOM online multiplayer mode is a different beast altogether, offering more closed-quarters environments perfect for online gameplay. But instead of sticking to the arena-based gameplay, it feels more like Call of Duty, with game modes like Team Deathmatch and Domination.

Read more in our full DOOM review.

Battlefield 1

Battlefield 1
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With Battlefield 1, EA and Dice have proven that sometimes it's best to take it back to basics. While the developers tried to do something different with Battlefield Hardline, FPS gamers crave the chaos and destruction of a battlefield, not shootouts at a bank in downtown New York. It puts an emphasis on the stories of the individuals in the first world war, and not the war itself, showing that those who fought the war – on both sides – were just like us, and it's a sobering realisation.

The interjection of statistics and other WW1 facts throughout the game are educational, and help gamers of today grasp just how devastating the first world war was.

A phenomenal single-player mode, fantastically enjoyable multiplayer and mechanics that'll keep us on our toes for some time makes Battlefield 1 one of our favourite games, possibly ever.

Find out more in our full Battlefield 1 review.

Prey

Prey
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When have secret experiments on space stations ever gone right? Throw in memory modifications and eery aliens and it's hard to really feel surprised that everything went a bit skewy on Prey's Talos I.

You step into the shoes of Morgan Yu, one of the station's head scientists, as you contend with the outbreak of the Typhon, an assortment of gooey black extraterrestrials with a penchant for mind control and murder.

While most of these enemies are pretty typical, the best are the Mimics, scuttling spiders that also have the ability to disguise themselves as every day objects - potentially making Prey the first game to scare you with a coffee cup.

There's a pretty open character progression system, with options to focus on strength, hacking and repairing, or more outlandish Typhon powers of your own, while Talos I itself is also open to explore (mostly) freely.

If there's a downside to Prey it's that the story, while initially promising, never quite comes together entirely. That, and it'll all feel very familiar if you've played the likes of BioShock or Dishonored before. Still, it's tremendous fun, and easy to recommend.

Read more in our Prey review.

Agents of Mayhem

Agents of Mayhem
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Set in the same universe as the Saints Row series, Volition's Agents of Mayhem is an extremely fun game to play with a distinct super hero movie/comic book vibe.

It features a wide range of characters to choose from, all with unique abilities and weaponry. The ability to switch between three characters on the fly is unique, and provides a unique way to approach battles.

But while the gameplay is fun, the storyline isn’t the most entertaining we’ve ever come across. It’s enough to get you through the campaign, it’s not a memorable one – and that’s a shame, given the developer’s history with the Saints Row series.

So while the gameplay is enjoyable, it’s a little short-lived and it isn’t a game we imagine you’ll sink weeks or months into.

Find out more in our full Agents of Mayhem review. 

Overwatch

Overwatch
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Overwatch is an online multiplayer first person shooter (FPS) and as such there is no single-player story mode to be found here. Instead, you'll simply play with others online, either your friends or a randomly selected bunch of other players from around the world. You'll be part of a team of six players on a random map and game mode.

There are more than 20 heroes to choose from in each match, spread across different classes: attack, defense, tank and support. With so many heroes there's plenty of variation, even within each class you're bound to find one or two that suits your personal style of play. Unlimited switching means you can try out lots of heroes within one match or make tactical substitutions based on what's happening at any given moment.

One of our only complaints about Overwatch is that we'd like more variation with the game modes, because despite being four different modes they're all quite similar.

There is a weekly brawl mode that's pretty fun, though. They change each week, with one forcing everyone to play as the same hero with 50 percent health, for example. The rules can be pretty much anything and it makes for some interesting gameplay that's for sure.

There might be some borrowed elements that feel a lot like Team Fortress 2, but Blizzard has done a grand job with Overwatch. It's fun, fast paced and accessible to a wide range of players of different abilities.

Find out more in our full Overwatch review.

Resident Evil 7: Biohazard

Resident Evil 7: Biohazard
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After a few disappointing games in a row, and a steady shift away from horror and towards AAA action, Resident Evil 7: Biohazard is an attempt to reclaim the franchise's survival horror crown. With a new first-person perspective and focus on hiding and stealth (lovingly borrowed from the likes of Amnesia and Alien: Isolation), there's a lot here that's new to the series, not least the setting: a Texas Chainsaw Massacre take Louisiana, complete with sweltering heat and bloodthirsty cannibals. 

But as much as it introduces new themes, Resident Evil 7 also harks back to the oldest games in the series. You'll be exploring a decrepit mansion, using green herbs to heal yourself, and carefully lining up headshots to save ammo - at least when you're not running away. 

Yeah, the story gets a bit silly (though mercifully avoids almost all the expansive Resident Evil lore - this is a great entry point to the series) and the boss fights are slightly rubbish, but Resident Evil 7 is really, really scary - and you can't ask for much more than that. Just don't ask us to try it out in PS VR, we haven't dared yet.

Read more in our full Resident Evil 7 review.

Rocket League

Rocket League
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One of the best games we've played in ages is as simple as a remote control car version of football. Yes, we're talking about Rocket League, which is soon to get its first major update called Rumble, which we can't wait to play.

For now, though, Rocket League has a simple premise that takes some time to master. Pick a car and join a match, and you'll be put into a huge stadium with a huge football that you'll need to attempt to get into the opposing team's goal.

The ball starts in the middle and it's go, go, go as you use the pads dotted around the pitch to get a boost, jump to block the ball from getting to close to your goal and drive up the walls to get the right angle for shooting and scoring.

There are various game modes, with each match lasting five minutes unless a tiebreak is required.

For added fun, you can customize your car with quirky items and new paint, and there are plenty of achievements to be won too.

At under £15, Rocket League is an absolute bargain. Yes, it's difficult to learn but once you get the hang of it, it's really hard to stop.

Read more in our full Rocket League review.

Everybody's Gone to the Rapture

Everybody's Gone to the Rapture
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This is an independent PS4-exclusive story-based game developed by The Chinese Room in which players find themselves transported to a quaint, deserted English village whose inhabitants have mysteriously disappeared.

The player can interact with floating orbs throughout the world that'll reveal snippets of the story, which in turn reveal the bigger picture. There is no map and no kind of heads-up display, which means you might miss bits and pieces – in fact there's a trophy for those that manage to find every snippet of the story.

It combines a sublime script with one of the best original soundtracks of any video game, composed by Jessica Curry – it was so popular that many argued it should be allowed into the UK Classical Charts, and is available to purchase separately.

You'll find yourself hanging off every word, and wanting to piece together each story to fully understand what went on in the quaint little town of Yaughton.